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TOBACCO REPORT 

l952-f953 







THE BULLETIN 

of fhe 

Norfh Carolina Department of Agriculture 

L. Y. Hallentixe, ('u)iiniixsi()ncr 

Number 130 March, 1953 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

I'age 
Flue-C'iirecl Tuljacco Outlook lor 1053 4 

Obligations of Farmers, Warehoiisemon and Huyers 

in ^larketing Tobacco - 8 

North Carolina Tol)acco Crops, 1919-19.5'2„. 13 

State Sununary, 19.5'2-1953 14 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouse Sales Report for 

Season 195'2-1953 -_._. IG 

Sunnnary of Dealer and Warehouse Resales, 19.5'-2-1953 18 

Producer and Gross Sales of Flue-Cured Tobacco 

by States, 195'2 18 

Stabilization Receipts by Belts, 19;5'2 . _ 18 

North Carolina Tobacco Allotments, 1953 19 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses and Operators 

by Belts and Markets, 1952 21 

Trends in the Tobacco Industry. 28 

Tobacco Consumption (Chart) Back Cover 



THE BULLETIN 

of the 

North Carolina Department of Agriculture 

I.. \'. IJali-kntink, Coninii.ssioiirr 

Number 130 March, 1953 



FOREWORD 

The fourth annual issue of the Tobacco Report has 
been compiled and jjrepared by W. P. Hedrick and J. H. 
Cyrus, tobacco specialists with the Division of Markets, 
in cooperation with the U.S.D.A. under the Research 
and Marketing Act. 

Credit for statistical data contained herein is due the 
Cooperative Crop Reporting Service of the North Caro- 
lina and United States Departments of Agriculture, the 
U.S.D.A. Tobacco Branch and the Field Service of the 
Production and Marketing Administration. 

This issue of The Bulletin is dedicated to North 
Carolina tobacco farmers and their families, whose 
labor and skill have made the golden leaf this State's 
most important cash crop, one that is responsible for 
well over half of our agricultiu'al income. 



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Cu)7n)usfii()>icr of .{(/riviilttii 



Vov free distribution liy the TolKicco Section, Markets Division. Nortli 
Cnrolinii Dei.artiiient of AKrienllme. Tlaleieh. N. C. 



Flue-Cured Tobacco Outlook for 1953 

Flue-cured tobacco growers on July 19, 1952, voted their over- 
whelming approval (98 per cent ) of acreage control and market- 
ing quotas for the 1953, 1954 and 1955 crops. On the basis of the 
announced acreage allotments, the 1953 crop will be cut eight 
per cent. These factors point to a favorable flue-cured price 
outlook for the 1953 season. 

Fertilizer supplies will be more readily available during the 
year and prices will be about the same as last year. 

The demand for insecticides and pesticides will be heavier 
than usual due to serious outbreaks of hornworms and neme- 
todes during the past season. The supplies of the necessary 
materials to combat these pests will be in good supply and 
prices will not be greatly different from those of 1952. 

Farm labor wage rates are expected to continue to rise 
throughout the State, while labor available will continue to 
decrease if high level industrial production continues. The need 
for increased efficiency will be more apparent during the coming 
year. More and more farmers will be under pressure to mech- 
anize and reduce hand labor where possible. 

Acreage 

Flue-cured acreage allotted to growers for 1953 will amount 
to 1,048,000 acres as against 1,127.000 allotted in 1952. This 
acreage, on the basis of average yields for the past five years, 
is estimated to produce 1,294 million pounds, or about 75 million 
pounds less than was produced last season. However, the acre- 
age for 1953 could, and probably will, produce more tobacco 
the coming season than was produced last year. 

The past growing season was abnormal in that the crop was 
plagued by excessive heat during .June and .luly. Temperatures 
i-eached 100 degrees or more 12 days in .June and four or more 
days in July. The high temperatures were accompanied by little 
or no rainfall in many areas of the tobacco belt. Tobacco, a 
sensitive crop, suffers more from the heat than from drought. 
Lack of moisture reduced the acreage yield and high temper- 
atures reduced the quality. Yields were below previous years' 
averages in every section except the Old Belt of North Caro- 
lina and Virginia. Fairly normal temperatures and rainfall this 
season would offset the eight per cent acreage reduction with 
increased yields. 



The Secretary of Agriculture has reserved one per cent of 
the total acreage allotment for adjustment on individual farms 
and for farms on which no flue-cured tobacco was grown dur- 
ing the past five years. 

Export Situation 

The yearly exports of flue-cured tobacco have averaged about 
425 million pounds for the past several years. World economic 
conditions always affect the amount exported each year to any 
country. 

England has for many years been our best customer. The 
British have announced a policy of maintaining consumer sup- 
plies of tobacco products but curtailing imports of United 
States tobacco during 1953. The proposal would indicate larger 
imports into England of tobacco from Canada, Rhodesia, or 
India. Similar proposals have been made every year since 1939: 
however, ways and means have been worked out each year 
to circumvent the disasterous effect such action would have on 
our flue-cured crop. The British Government colledected $1,725 



\ 




Flue-cured tobacco stored in hogsheads for the domestic and export 
markets. 



million dollars in tobacco duty during 1952, and it is doubtful 
that the British will use too great a cjuantity of Empire tobacco, 
which carries a preferential duty. 

However, as flue-cured tobacco goes to a great many foreign 
countries, the loss we may suffer in Britain is expected to be 
offset by purchases of other countries where economic condi- 
tions have improved during the past year. 

Economic conditions are improving in most European coun- 
tries and cigarette consumption is gaining rapidly. The prefer- 
ence is for American blended cigarettes. Western Germany, our 
second largest flue-cured customer, seems to be in position to 
purchase larger quantities than were bought in 1952. Ranking 
third as a purchaser of flue-cured tobacco is the Philippine Re- 
public. Australia, Belgium, Ireland, The Netherlands and 
Indonesia are substantial customers in the order named. As 
economic conditions change from year to year, some countries 
buy more while others buy less. Therefore, the export situation 
should be stronger in 195.3 and total exports should exceed 450 
million pounds. 

Exports of manufactured tobacco products, cigarettes prin- 
cipally, have increased in recent years. About 38 billion cigar- 
ettes are exported annually, 16 billion going to foreign coun- 
tries and 22 billion to overseas armed forces. American cigar- 
ettes are available in almost every country in the world, with 
France, Panama and Tangier being the leaders. The Philippine 
Republic, while still a large user of American cigarettes, has 
shown a decrease due to restrictive legislation favoring local 
tobacco products. Other countries will replace our losses and 
exports should continue around 40 billion in 1953. 

Domestic Situation 

The domestic demand for flue-cured tobacco is expected to 
remain strong through 1953. Domestic manufacturers used 777 
million pounds last year, and large requirements of cigarette 
manufacturers will tend to increase domestic demand slightly 
during 1953. The percentage of medium and better grades of 
leaf available from the 1952 crop was smaller than normal be- 
cause of unfavorable weather conditions. Therefore, the demand 
for this type leaf will encourage competition next season. 

Cigarette output in the United States during 1953 should go 
above the record 430 billion manufactured in 1952. About nine- 
tenths of the total output, or 392 billion, are consumed in this 

6 



country. With prospects that employment and consumer in- 
come will continue high and that there will be more smokers 
coming into the picture, domestic consumption should continue 
to rise. 

Smoking tobacco continues to show a slight decrease in con- 
sumption, and only 97 million pounds were manufactured dur- 
ing 1952. This is the lowest consumption figure since 1900. The 
reason is that when income and employment are at a high level, 
the tendency of the smoking public is to use the more con- 
venient cigarette. The outlook is for a leveling off in the future 
and for consumption to remain about the same in 1953. 

Chewing tobacco is expected to continue a steady decline in 
use during the coming year. The consumption of this type 
tobacco product has dropped 25 per cent since the end of World 
War II. 

Snuff, the mystery product of the tobacco industry, con- 
tinues to hold its own. Consumption has varied little during 
the past 30 years, annual consumption ranging from a low of 
36 million pounds to a high of 41 million pounds. Thirty-nine 
million pounds were manufactured last year, and the manu- 
facture in 1953 is expected to be the same. 

Government Price Supports 

Price supports were available to flue-cured growers during 
the 1952 selling season at $50.60 per hundred pounds, which 
represented 90 per cent of the parity price. 

The 1949 agricultural act provides that the level of price 
support shall be announced in advance of the planting season. 
The law provides that this price can not be reduced; however, 
should the parity price of farm products increase, the support 
price can be raised accordingly. The price supports for the 1953 
flue-cured crop will be a little lower than the $50.60 per hun- 
dred pounds in effect during 1952. 



Obligations of Farmers, Warehousemen 
And Buyers in Marketing Tobacco 

The marketing machinery for mo\'ing tobacco from the farm 
into the channels of trade is divided into three distinct phases. 
First, the cured leaves must be graded or sorted and properly 
assembled for market; this responsibility falls to the farmer. 
Second, the graded tobacco must be properly weighed, ticketed 
and displayed for sale; this is the responsibility of the ware- 
houseman who also conducts the auction sale. The third pha.se 
is the actual auction sale in which the buyers determine the 
price according to the quality and demand for each lot of 
tobacco displayed. Maximum efficiency in operating this mar- 
keting system is obtained when there is a high state of coop- 
eration between the three groups in performing their obliga- 
tions to each other. 

The farmer's obligation to the warehouseman and buyers 
starts with the preparation of his tobacco for market. The 
grower should do the very best job possible in grading his 
tobacco into uniform lots on the farm and in packing it in uni- 
form lots at the warehouse. There are several reasons why the 
grower should take precautions and pride in handling his 
tobacco for market. First of all, he will receive more money 
for a crop of tobacco properly prepared and assembled for 
market. 

Another reason why growers should follow the best market- 
ing practices is the fact that the grower's identity on the ware- 
house ticket goes with his tobacco all the way to the buyer's 
plant. Therefore, growers who follow unscrupulous practices 
of "nesting" tobacco, such as concealing damaged or inferior 
quality or foreign matter inside a pile, are identified by the 
buyer and warehouseman after the tobacco reaches the redrying 
plant, and the warehouseman is required to reimburse the 
buyers for all losses that occur due to nested tobacco. Thus, 
the warehousemen know the growers who make a practice 
of misrepresenting their tobacco by nesting it. 

Furthermore, a person who offers nested tobacco for sale is 
incriminating himself. According to North Carolina Laws, 
Chapter 106, article 40, paragraph 4(il, "It shall be unlawful for 
any person, firm or corporation to sell or offer for sale, upon 
any leaf tobacco warehouse floor, any pile or piles of tobacco 

S 



which are nested, shingled, or overhung so as to conceal the 
true nature of the piles." Also, Section 10 of the Federal Tobacco 
Inspection Act provides that "It shall be unlawful knowing 
that tobacco is to be offered for inspection under this act to 
load, pack, or arrange such tobacco in such manner as know- 
ingly to conceal foreign matter or tobacco of inferior grade, 
quality, or condition." Section 12 of the Act makes it a mis- 
demeanor, punishable by a fine or imprisonment to offer such 
tobacco for inspection. Thus, every tobacco farmer is under 
obligations to the industry to do a good job in preparing and 
assembling his tobacco for market, and he should accept this 
responsibility by following approved practices. 

The warehouseman, who is middleman between the farmer 
and buyer, is responsible to both groups for performing such 
services and activities as will facilitate the orderly marketing 
of tobacco. The warehouseman furnishes all facilities for selling 
tobacco, which includes a well lighted warehouse, scales, bas- 
kets, trucks for moving the tobacco on the floor, personnel to 
assist growers in getting their tobacco properly displayed on 




Buyers inspect each basket of tobacco oft'erecl and signal their bids. 

9 



the sales floor, the auctioneer, and office personnel to take care 
of business transactions involved in selling tobacco. 

After the sale has been completed, the office personnel im- 
mediately pays the farmer for his crop and later collects from 
the buyers. Thus, the warehouseman acts as a sales agent for 
the producer and a disbursing agent for the buyer. The farmer 
pays the warehouseman for this marketing service through fees 
and commissions; therefore, the warehouseman is obligated to 
give each individual farmer the same unbiased service, and to 
protect him against losses whenever possible. In other words, 
the warehouseman should not make or grant any customer a 
rebate in charges or money allowances, or concessions of any 
kind, or any discrimination in favor of or against any producer 
in any manner whatsoever. 

The warehousemen should also endeavor to protect growers 
against the danger of losses in the selling of tobacco prior to 
the opening of the auction markets, and they should not par- 
ticipate either directly or indirectly in pre-season buying, nor 
in any way encourage pre-season buying. In order to further 
protect the grower, warehousemen should not speculate or 
finance the operation of any speculator buying tobacco on his 
floor. The only justification the warehouseman has for buying 
tobacco for his leaf account is for the sole purpose of protecting 
the price for the benefit of the grower. 

The warehouseman is responsible to the buyers, as well as 
the growers, for honest weights. All tobacco offered for sale 
on a warehouse floor should be accurately weighed to the 
nearest even pound at the time it is unloaded and placed on 
display on the auction floor, and each basket and truck used 
in weighing tobacco must be uniform in weight with a maxi- 
mum tolerance of one pound. In order to further protect the 
buyer against short weights, no leaves or bundles of tobacco 
should be picked up or removed from the immediate area where 
the tobacco was sold at auction until the purchasers have re- 
moved the baskets of tobacco from the immediate area. 

On the other side of this marketing triangle are the buyers 
who determine the price for each lot of tobacco the farmer offers 
for sale. When the individual grower brings his tobacco to mar- 
ket, he is but one of thousands of producers, and like the pro- 
ducers of most farm products, is unable by his own action to 
affect the price. He is selling a .semi-perishable product which 
can not be withheld from the market and stored for any lengthy 

10 



period in order to wait for higher prices. Even if it could be 
stored, many tobacco growers would still be anxious to sell 
as soon as possible because of debts and their dependence on 
tobacco as their principle source of income. Therefore, the 
buyers are under obligations to the farmer who is depending 
on them to pay a fair price for each lot of tobacco offered for 
sale without discrimination. When a buyer places the final and 
highest bid on a pile of tobacco, the law does not permit him 
to reject the purchase, unless such rejection is made by the 
buyer upon evidence that such tobacco is nested, false packed, 
shingled, in unsafe keeping order, or damaged. Thus, the final 
bid placed on a pile of tobacco, that has been properly graded 
and assembled for market, is a binding bid to the buyer. How- 
ever, the grower can always accept or reject any bid placed 
on his tobacco if he is not satisfied with the price offered. 

The producer has three outstanding advantages in marketing 
tobacco through the auction system. First, he can sell his 
entire crop quickly regardless of size or quality. Second, he 
receives immediate cash for his leaf sales, and third, he is re- 
lieved of any responsibility for locating buyers or for negotiating 
the sale. The system is also an advantage to the buyer since 
he or his representative can personally inspect each basket of 




i!a.skets of tobacco properly displayed on a well lighted warehouse 
floor, with the auction sale in progress. 

11 



tobacco offered and purchase the quality of tobacco desired. 
Also, the large amount of tobacco concentrated on the ware- 
house floors make it easy for buyers to purchase large volumes 
of tobacco of the same qualities. The warehouseman, who is the 
third party involved in the transaction, takes care of all negotia- 
tions between the farmer and buyer. 

This system of marketing tobacco through warehouse auction 
sales has been the subject of heated contro\'ersy in recent years, 
but from the standpoint of economy the system seems to operate 
with reasonable efficiency. How'ever, the eflRciency with which 
the system operates can be further perfected by a closer work- 
ing relationship between the farmers, warehousemen and buy- 
ers in performing their obligations to each other. 






12 



North Carolina Tobacco Crops 1919-1952' 







Yield Per 








Year 


No. Acres 


Acre 


Production 


Value 


Average 






(Pounds) 


(1000 lbs.) 


(1000 Dollars) 


Price 






FLUE-CURED 






1919 


521,500 


612 


319,276 


$157,340 


S49.30 


1920 


621,900 


681 


423,703 


88,271 


20.80 


1921 


414,900 


594 


246,540 


60.402 


24.50 


1922 


444.000 


611 


271.170 


74.572 


27.50 


1923 


544,300 


728 


396,354 


81.998 


20.70 


1924 


473,500 


585 


276,819 


62.597 


22.60 


1925 


536,200 


696 


373,352 


83.756 


22.40 


1926 


546,700 


692 


378,274 


96,762 


25.60 


1927 


639,600 


755 


482,982 


100,414 


20.80 


1928 


712.400 


692 


493,132 


93,450 


19.00 


1929 


729,300 


665 


484,630 


89,470 


18.50 


1930 


768,000 


757 


581.200 


74,733 


12.90 


1931 


688,500 


692 


476,382 


42,024 


8.80 


1932 


462,500 


624 


288,750 


34,949__ 


12.10 


1933 


667,800 


794 


530,133 


85,530 


16.10 


1934 


486.500 


847 


412,055 


117,999 


28.60 


1935 


612,500 


635 


572,625 


116,418 


20.30 


1936 


591,000 


765 


451,975 


101,856 


22.50 


1937 


675,000 


883 


595,815 


143.058 


24.00 


1938 


603,500 


844 


509,470 


115.428 


22.70 


1939 


843,000 


964 


812,540 


123,893 


15.20 


1940 


498,000 


1.038 


516,835 


85,792 


16.60 


1941 


488.000 


928 


452.825 


132,291 


29.20 


1942 


539.000 


1,052 


566,810 


221,538 


39.10 


1943 


580.000 


935 


.542,200 


219,074 


40.40 


1944 


684,000 


1,077 


736,990 


317,628 


43.10 


1945 


722,000 


1.100 


794,310 


349,148 


44.00 


1946 


802,000 


1,138 


912,970 


451,639 


49.50 


1947 


783,000 


1,139 


892,205 


374.513 


42.00 


1948 


.594.000 


1,239 


739,380 


368,040 


49.80 


1949 


621.000 


1,178 


731,530 


3.52.685 


48.20 


1950 


640,000 


1.341 


858.140 


477.508 


55.00 


1951 


738,000 


1,325 


977.640 


.522,982 


53.50 


1952 


738,000 


1,200 


904.320 


452,160** 


50.00'* 



BURLEY LIGHT AIR-CURED 



1934 


5.500 


870 


4.785 


.S 809 


$17.50 


1935 


5.200 


925 


4.810 


1,025 


21.30 


1936 


B.OOO 


900 


5.400 


2,095 


38.80 


1937 


9.000 


975 


8.775 


1,787 


21.40 


1938 


8.600 


900 


7,740 


1,308 


16.90 


1939 


8.100 


1.070 


8,667 


1,447 


16.70 


1940 


6,500 


1.050 


6,825 


1,242 


18.20 


1941 


6,200 


1,075 


6,665 


2,093 


31.40 


1942 


6,000 


1,150 


7,!390 


3,211 


42.30 


1943 


8,. 500 


1,225 


10,412 


,->,102 


49.00 


1944 


12,000 


1,390 


16,680 


8,157 


48.90 


1945 


13,000 


1„500 


19,500 


7,568 


38.30 


1946 


9,800 


1,475 


14,455 


5,999 


41.50 


1947 


9,600 


1„560 


14,976 


6,335 


42.30 


1948 


10,300 


1,680 


17,304 


8,012 


46.30 


1949 


10.800 


1,440 


15,552 


6,750 


43.40 


1950 


10. ,500 


1,700 


17,850 


9,175 


51.40 


1951 


12,200 


1,7,50 


21,350 


11,572 


54.20 


1952 


12.200 


1.600 


19.520 


9,387*' 


48.50' 



•Source: N. C. and U.S.D.A. Crop Reporting Service. 
'Estimate of Division of Markets based on Producer; 



State Summary 1952-1953 

North Carolina tobacco growers suffered substantial drops in yield, quality 
and monetary value for the 1952 crop as compared with 1951. The drops were 
caused by extremely hot and dry conditions which prevailed during the grow- 



ing season. 



The marketing of the 1952 crop of flue-cured tobacco got under way in 
North Carolina on August 4, 1952, and sales continued in the different belts 
until January 9, 1953, covering a period of 103 sale days. Producer sales on 
the 44 flue-cured markets operating during the season amounted to 877,396,736 
pounds, which sold for a sum of $440,396,598. This gives North Carolina 
growers a season average of 150.19 per hundred pounds, which is $3.67 below 
the avergae of $53.86 received by the growers last year for a record crop of 
952,035,210 pounds, that sold for $512,773,475. Thus, the 1952 producer sales 
fell short of the previous year's sales by 74,638,474 pounds, with a drop in value 
of $72,376,877. 

Type 13 — The eight markets in the North Carolina Border Belt opened on 
August 4 for the 1952 season. Volume of sales was light during the first two 
weeks due to a late crop, but the movement of tobacco to market was about 
normal for the remainder of the season. Average prices for about two-thirds of 
the grades showed increases ranging from 50?' to $5.00 per hundred, compared 
with the 1951 crop. Offerings contained large proportions of common to fair 
quality leaf and nondescript, and smaller percentages of smoking leaf, cutters 
and lugs. Growers selling tobacco in this belt received $74,800,200 in 1952 for 
144,179,615 pounds of tobacco, averaging $51.88 per hundred. Last year they 
averaged $53.28 per hundred for 169,019,498 pounds. Final sales were held in the 
border belt on October 29th with a season of 62 sale days as compared with 64 
last year. 

Type 12 — Auction sales on the 17 Eastern Belt markets were started on 
August 21, which is the same date these markets opened in 1951. The 1952 
selling season in this belt was marked by declines in average prices, quality of 
offerings, and volume of sales. Average prices decreased for nearly four-fifths of 
the grades as compared with last year. Most of the losses ranged from $1.00 to 
$4.00 per hundred. Around two-thirds of the sales consisted of common to good 
leaf, fair to good lugs and nondescript, and the proportion of cutters was about 
one-half less than in 1951. Season sales of producer's tobacco in this belt were 
only 442,271,010 pounds returning the growers $225,464,389, which is a .season 
average of $50.98 per hundred. Comparative figures for the previous year show 
that growers sold 486,806,521 pounds for $270,653,037, averaging $56.53 per 
hundred pounds. The 1952 season of 74 sale days was completed on December 
5 with the closing of markets at Wilson and Rocky Mount. Last year this belt 
operated for 71 sale days. 

14 



Type 1 IB— The Middle Belt held first sales of the season on September 4 
at the five markets located in the southern area of the belt known locally as the 
"sandhill markets." The other five markets in the belt opened on September 8. 
Offerings consisted chiefly of common to good quality leaf, fair grades of smok- 
ing leaf and lugs, and nondescript. The proportion of cutters was reduced nearly 
one-half, and there was more than twice as much nondescript as there was dur- 
ing the prior year. Changes in average prices by grades were mixed, with the 
number of gains and losses about equal. Producer sales for the season totaled 
158,669,839 pounds, wfiich returned the growers $79,147,911 for an average of 
149.88 per hundred. Last year growers in this belt received $92,680,680 from 
170781,145 pounds, which averaged $54.27 per hundred. The season ended on 
December 12 after operating for 69 sale days, which is the same number of days 
this belt operated last year. 

Type llA— Opening auction sales were held in the Old Belt on September 22. 
The volume and value of the 1952 crop of Old Belt tobacco were the second 
largest on record. However, the general average decreased from the previous 
year because of lower quality of offerings. From the grade average standpoint, 
some grades showed increases while others declined, with a few more losses 
than gains. Around two-thirds of the tobacco offered consisted of common to 
good leaf, low and fair smoking leaf and nondescript. The proportion of cutters 
marketed was imusually small. The nine North Carolina Old Belt markets sold 
132,276,272 pounds of tobacco for producers during the season, returning them 
$60,984,098 which is a season average of $46.10 per hundred. Producer sales in 
1951 amounted to only 125,428,046 pounds which sold for $59,379,734 for an 
average of $47.34 per hundred. The 1952 Old Belt marketing season was ex- 
tended over into January for the first time since the 1947-48 season. Final sales 
were held on January 9th, which gave them a total of 68 sale days as compared 
with 66 last year. 

Type 31— The hurley markets in North Carolina, located at AsheviUe, Boone, 
and West Jefferson, opened for the 1952-53 season on December 1. The volume 
of sales and quality of offerings dropped considerably below those of the pre- 
vious year. The markets were flooded with large quantities of wet tobacco, 
especially early in the season, and there was also a considerable amount of 
frozen tobacco in most of the dark leaf and tip grades. There was no support 
price on wet and frozen tobacco and very little demand for it. Therefore, most of 
the wet and frozen lots brought prices far below the 90% of parity price, thus 
causing the general average to be depressed several dollars per hundred. The 
three North Carolina markets sold 14,778,764 poimds of tobacco for hurley 
growers, returning them $7,189,834 for an average of $48.65 per hundred. 
Growers sold 16,334,983 pounds last year for $8,860,887, averaging $54.24 per 
hundred. Auction sales ended on North Carolina markets on January 23, which 
crave them a marketing season of 30 sale days. 

15 



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Summary of Dealer and Warehouse Resales — 1952-53 



Resale 


Pounds 






Resale 


Dollars 


Dealer 


Warehouse 


Total 


Dealer 


Warehouse 


Toial 



N. C. Border Belt Type 13 

11.366,328 19,978,966 S 3,376,504 S 5.930.269 S 9.506.773 

N. C. Eastern Belt Type 12 



14,672.110 


31. .366,534 


46,008,644 5,809,461 
N. C. Middle Belt Type IIB 


15.448.176 


21,237,637 


7.564.560 


10.887.649 


18,452,209 3.023.196 
N. C. Old Belt Type UA 


5.284.909 


8.308,105 


5.410.620 


8.405,567 


13.816.277 2.170.471 
N. C. Burley Belt Type 31 


3,847.354 


6.017.825 


1.523.262 


1.173.322 


2.696.584 710.761 
S. C. Type 13 


506.951 


1.217.712 


7,911,314 


11.921,868 


18.833.182 3.511.177 
Ga. Type 14 


0.072.374 


9.583,551 


5,937.076 


S,030,49S 


13.967.574 2.679.601 

Fla. Type 14 
2.322.331 

Va. Type llA 
13.575.349 


3.S04.333 


6.483.934 
1.205.354 
6.323,398 



Producer and Gross Sales of Flue-Cured by States 1952 

PRODUCER SALES GROSS SALES 

STATE Pounds Average Price Pounds Average Price 

N. C. 877,396,736 .$50.19 975.652,832 $49.76 

Va. 171,450,840 50.79 185,026,189 50.48 

S. C. 148,763,209 52.94 168,596,391 52.40 

Ga. 142.907,011 49.06 156,874.585 48.82 

Fla. 20,486.535 51.79 22.808.866 51.80 

Total 1..361.004.331 .S,50.47 1..508.958.863 $50.08 



Stabilization Receipts by Belts 1952 



Bell Type 

01(1 Belt llA 

Middle Belt IIH 

Kaslern Belt 12 

Horder Belt 13 

Ca.Fla. Belt 14 

Total 1114 



Producers' Sales 
(lbs.) 



Stabilization 
Receipts (th%.) 



Percentage 
Slab. Receive 



303.727,112 


61,081,013 


20.1 


158,6(>9.8:i9 


19.047,844 


12.0 


442,271,010 


3!>,404,738 


12.5 


292,942,824 


22,9.53..501 


7.8 


163.393,.34(; 


0,313,896 


3.9 


.361,004.331 


165.000.992 


12.1 



18 



North Carolina Tobacco Allotments — 1953' 

Flue-Cured 

Counly No. Farms Acres 

Alamance 1426 6.993.7 

Alexander 997 2,195.8 

Anson 260 o84.7 

Beaufort 2711 13,916.9 

Bertie 1833 8,291.8 

Bladen 3644 10,845.6 



pleas;; ITOTE the FOLLCY/ING CORRECTICNS: 



Page 18 should show the following producer and grosLJ sales of Flue-Cured 
by states in 1952: 

PRODUCER 3ALES GROS.S SALES 

pounds Average poignds Average 

Virginia lo8,062,192 $^0,78 181,657, 5i|l $50,U7 

TOTAL 1,357,655,683 ^.50. 1^7 l,5o5, 590, 215 C-50.07 



On page 19 the N. C. Tobacco Allotments for 1953 should be; 
County Acres Rank 
Person li^,,Gl8,5 20 



Rowan "n 

Sampson 5948 

Scotland 534 

Stokes 2811 

Surr.v 3407 

Tyrell 1 

Vance 1546 

Wake 4059 

Warren 2085 

Washington 286 

Wavne 3083 

Wilkes 1003 

Wilson 2208 

Yadkin 2739 

TOTAL 126,206 689,487.1 1-73 

1 Source: U. S. Production & Marketing Administration. 

19 




Summary of Dealer and Warehouse Resales — 1952-53 



Resale 


Pounds 








Resa 


e Dollars 


Dealer 


Warehouse 


Total 


Dealer 


Ware 


lOuse 


Total 



N. C. Border Belt Type 13 



" 


Belt 


Type 


Producers' Sales 
(lbs.) 


Subilizalion 
ReceipU (lbs.) 


PercetiUKC 
Stab. Received 




llA 


:)03. 727.1 12 

i.is.ram.s:?!) 

442.271.010 
292.942.824 
10.3, 39.-). .WO 


01,081.013 
19.047.844 
.").3,404.73S 
22.9.53..')01 
fi,.'513.890 


20.1 


Middle Belt 

?;asteni Belt 

Border Belt - 

Da.Fla. Belt 


IIB 

12 

13 

14 

11-14 


12.0 
12.5 
7.8 
3.9 


Total 


1.301.004.331 


16.5.000.992 


12,1 



18 



Norf-h Carolina Tobacco Allotments — 1953' 

Flue-Cured 

County No. Farms Acres Rank 

Alamance 1426 6,993.7 36 

Alexander 997 2,195.8 ol 

Anson 260 584.7 61 

Beaufort 2711 13,916.9 20 

Bertie 1833 S.291.8 32 

Bladen 3644 >?'§^3" H 

Brunswick 1879 4,773.7 43 

Cabarrus 1 ^0.1 73 

Caldwell 269 706.1 o9 

Camden 2 6.8 68 

Carteret 441 1,969.6 52 

Caswell 1951 13.425.7 22 

Catawba 6 , , ,°-}. ,c 

Chatham 1199 "^-H^-^ i^ 

Chawan 204 795.1 58 

Cleveland 2 „, ^g *"% 

Columbus 5650 23,776.5 7 

Craven _ 1931 12,435.8 23 

Cumberland 2592 7,646.5 34 

Currituck 2 0.9 71 

Davidson 1745 4,956.3 40 

Davie _ 899 1,941.9 53 

Duplin":: 5061 22,516.9 8 

Durham 1081 o,714.U 39 

Kdgecombe 1630 ll^'T^OR 17 

Fofsvth -- 2185 7,473.3 3d 

Franklin"::.: 2945 16,693.8 18 

Gaston 4 7.2 67 

Gates 133 396.9 62 

Granville 2148 19,461.0 13 

Greene 1192 17,537.7 15 

Guilford"': 3238 13,626.8 21 

Halifax 2342 8,592.6 31 

Harnett 3985 21,125.3 11 

Hertford 1069 4,729.9 44 

Hoke 1051 4,130.5 47 

Hyde _ 8 9.2 65 

Iredell" 829 1,882.3 54 

Johnston":::: 6024 32,959.3 2 

Jones --- 967 7,899.4 33 

Lenoir :'" - - 1958 20,322.6 12 

Martin 1707 12,381.7 24 

Mecklenburg 4 2.0 70 

Montgomery 444 I'^SZS S§ 

Moore 1622 6,722.7 37 

Nash 3039 26,494.2 5 

New Hanover 120 290.4 63 

Northampton 225 687.8 60 

Onslow :. 1880 9.118.6 29 

Orange 938 4,889.4 42 

Pamlico _ 448 1.590.5 5o 

Pender 1731 4,695.9 45 

Person 1774 4.018.5 48 

Pitt - 2705 36,890.4 1 

Randolph 1637 4,935.1 41 

Richmond 1102 3,022.4 49 

Robeson 5138 29,957.9 3 

Rockingham 3066 19,044.6 14 

Rowan 41 81.8 64 

Sampson 5948 22,137.1 9 

Scotland 534 10.660.6 28 

Stokes 2811 16,739.3 16 

Surry 3407 1.5,951.5 19 

Tvre'll 1 0.6 72 

Vance --- 1546 11.798.4 26 

Wake '" - - - 4059 28,374.5 4 

Warren 2085 8.973.6 30 

Washington 286 1.376.0 57 

Wavne __ __ --- 3083 21.128.0 10 

Wilkes 1003 2,279.5 .50 

Wilson - 2208 24,491.0 6 

Yadkin : - 2739 11.832.8 25 

TOTAL 126,206 689,487.1 1-73 

1 Source: U. S. Production & Marketing Administration. 

19 



Burley 



Counly No. Farms Acres 

Alexander 3 1.3 

Alleghany 434 254.1 

Ashe 2240 1,336.0 

Avery 224 ISl.b 

Buncombe 3123 2,1.57.8 

Burke 8 4.4 

Caldwell 28 15.4 

Catawba 5 1.7 

Cherokee 154 71.1 

Clay 160 90.4 

Cleveland 6 2.8 

Davidson 5 4.0 

Durham 1 0.9 

Gaston 2 1.7 

Graham 707 390.3 

Haywood 2101 1,500.6 

Henderson 114 57.6 

Iredell 3 1.4 

Jackson 269 131.0 

Lincoln 1 0.1 

McDowell 78 35.0 

Macon 178 66.0 

Madison 3226 3,594.8 

Mecklenburg 1 0.9 

Mitchell 969 638.5 

Polk 3 1.1 

Randolph 1 0.7 

Rutherford 76 39.0 

Stokes 1 0.2 

Surrv 1 0.1 

Swain 191 68.2 

Transylvania 65 -13.4 

Watauga 1554 1,001.3 

Wilkes 11 3.7 

Yancey 2021 1,472.3 

TOTAL 17.964 13.119.4 



20 



I 



North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses and 
Operators by Belts and Markets — 1952 

N. C. BORDER BELT 

Chadbourn (one set buyers) 

Carters No. 1 & 2 — J. C. Green, H. Perry, Joe Bryant 
Meyers — J. H. Harper, J. D. Hendley 
New Brick— W. C. Coats, jr. 
New Farmers — O. L. Littleton 

Clarkton (one set buyers) 

Banners — B. F. Rivenbark, J. H. Bryant 

Bright Leaf— B. F. Rivenbark, J. H. Bryant 

New Bladen— H. M. Clark, M. L. Fisher 

New Clarkton — E. L. Dudley, J. A. Chesnutt, Bob Dale 

Fair Bluff (one set buyers) 

Powell— A. H. Powell, A. L. Carver 

Planters — N. N. Love 

Littleton's No. 1 & 2 — O. P. Littleton 

Fairmont (four sets buyers) 

Big 5 — E. J. Chambers, A. O. Reeves Co. 

Roberson County — E. J. Chambers, A. O. Reeves Co. 

Peoples — E. J. Chambers, A. O. Reeves Co. 

Davis — F. A. Davis, Harry & Jack Mitchell 

Mitchell-Davis — F. A. Davis, Harry & Jack Mitchell 

Frye No. 1 & 2— E. H. Frye, J. W. and J. M. HoUiday 

HoUiday— E. H. Frye, J. W. and J. M. Holliday 

Planters No. 1 & 2 — G. R. Royster 

Square Deal 1-2-3 — W. G. Bessett 

Star-Carolina 1-2-3— T. S. Booker, C. A. Blankenship, W. G. Sheets, 

A. A. Fowler 
Twin State 1-2-3— P. R. Floyd, Jr., R. J. Harris, Paul Wilson 
Liberty 1-2-3— E. P. Joyce, J. A. Pell, P. O. Wilson, P. R. Floyd, Jr. 

Fayetteville (one set buyers) 

Big Farmers — R. H. Barbour, P. L. Campbell 
Wellons — J. W. Stephenson, J. C. Adams 

Lumberton (three sets buyers) 

Britts— J. R. Musgrove, W 6c C Charfin. ]. S. Waldcii, |r. 

Carolina — M. A. Roycroft, J. L. Townsend 

Dixie — N. A. McKeithan, J. A. Rinlow, E. K. Biggs 

Hedgepeth — R. A. Hedgepeth, ]. K. Roycroft, R. L. Rollins 

Liberty— R. E. Wilkens, F. S. White, R. H. Livenmore, H. D. Goode 

Smith— T. J. Smith, Paul Sands, H. P. Allen 

Star, Inc.— Hogan Teater, T. J. Stephenson 

Tabor City (one set buyers) 

Carolina — R. C. Coleman, Mrs. Harriet Sikes 
New Farmers — R. C. Coleman, Mrs. Harriet Sikes 



21 



Garrells— G. R. & C. E. Walden, B. A. & O. D. Garrell 
Planters — Don Watson, Mgr. 

Whiteville (three sets buyers) 

Brooks — L. H. & Blair Motley 

Motley — L. H. & Blair Motley 

Crutchfield— G. E. & R. W. Crutchfield 

Lea's No. 1 & 2 — Wm. Townes Lea 

Moores — A. H. Moore 

Nelson's No. 1 & 2 — -John H. Nelson 

Perkins-Newman — H. L. & J. W. Perkins, N. C. Newman 

Planters No. 1 & 2— A. O. King, Jr., J. W. Peay 

Tuggles— A. Dial Gray, J. L. Neal Vl 

Farmers — A. Dial Gray, J. L. Neal 

Columbus County — A. Dial Gray, J. L. Neal 

EASTERN BELT 

Ahoskie (one set buyers) 

Basnight No. 1 & 2— L. L. Wilkens, H. G. Veacey 

Farmers No. 1 & 2 — W. D. Odom, E. R. Evans .■ 

L 
Clinton (one set buyers) '■ 

Big Sampson — Mrs. Z. D. McWhorter, Ennis Bass, G. S. Strickland 

Carolina — Mrs. Z. D. McWhorter, Ennis Bass, G. S. Strickland 

Center Brick — Guy R. Ross 

Ross No. 2 — Guy R. Ross 

Farmers — Hubert & Joe Carr, Fulton Lockamy 

Dunn (one set buyers) 

Big 4 Warehouse — A. B. & |. M. Currin, O. G. Calhoun, T. B. Smothers 
Growers — J. R. Owens 

Farmville (two sets buyers) 

Bell's— L. R. Bell & Sons, C. C. Ivey & Bros. 

Farmers — John N. Fountain, Mgr. 

Fountains — John N. Fountain, Mgr. 

Monks No. 1 & 2— J. Y. Monk, R. D. Rouse, |. C. Cartlon, G. Webb 

Planters — M. J. Moye, Chester Worthington, C. C. Harris 

Goldsboro (one set buyers) 

Carolina — S. G. Best, Bruce Smith, ]. 1. Musgravc 

Farmers No. 1 & 2— S. B. Hill, Carl Holloman. W. M. Rouse. H. Benton 

Tin — J. I. Musgrave, W. M. Barnes 

Victory — J. B. Scott, R. Smith, J. Hopewell. P. Rridgcrs 

Greenville ( live sets buyers) 

Center Brick — M. D. Lassiter 

Dixie — W. T. Connon, Carlton Dail 

Farmers — J. A. Tripp 

Harris-Rogers — R. E. Rogers, R. E. Harris 

Keel's Coop. — J. T. Keel, Mgr. 

McGowans No. 1 & 2 — C. H. McGowan 

Morton's — W. Z. Morton 

22 



I 



New Carolina No. 1 & 2 — Floyd McGowan 
New Independent — D. W. Worthington 
New Enterprise — D. W. Worthington 
Star No. 1 & 2— B. B. Suggs, G. V. Smith 
Victory — Guy & H. Forbes, O. L. Joyner, Jr. 
Raynor & Harris — N. G. Raynor & C. C. Harris 

Kinston (four full sets buyers — fifth set incomplete) 
Brooks — J. R. & Fred Brooks 

Central — J. E. Jones, C. W. Wooten, L. A. Grange 
Eagle — -Percy Holden 
New Carolina — Percy Holden 
Farmers — J. T. Jenkins, L. E. Pollock 
Kinston Coop. — D. W. Hodges, Mgr. 
Knott Warehouse, Inc. — K. W. Loftin, Mgr. 
Knots New — H. G. Knott, W. E. Brewer 

New Dixie — John Jenkins, Mgr. 

Planters — L. O. Stokes, Mgr. 
Sheppard No. 1 & 2 — R. E. Sheppard 
Tapps— Bill King, Mgr. 
The Star Warehouse — C. J. Herring 

Robersonville (one set buyers) 

Adkins & Bailey — I. M. Little 

Central 6e New Red Front — J. H. Gray 

Planters No. 1 & 2 — H. T. Highsmith, E. G. Anderson 

Rocky Mount (four sets buyers) 

Cobb & Foxhall No. 1 & 2— W. E. Cobb, H. P. Foxhall 

Mangum — Roy M. Phipps 

Planters No. 1-2-3 — Benard Faulkner, Mgr. 

Smith No. 1 & 2 — James D. Smith 

Works Warehouse — R. J. Works & Son 

Easley Warehouse Co., Inc. — H. A. Easley, Mgr. 

Fenners — J. B. Fenner 

Farmers Warehouse, Inc. — J. Holt Evans, Mgr. 

Smithlield (two sets buyers) 

Big Planters — Dorothy Carter, J. B. Wooten, E. H. Valentine 

Farmers No. 1 & 2 — N. L. Daughtery, G. G. Adams, W. L. Kennedy 

Gold Leaf No. 1 & 2— R. A. Pearce 

Perkins Riverside — N. L. Perkins 

Wallace No. 1 & 2 — Lawrence, Dixon & Holton Wallace 

Tarboro (one set buyers) 

Clarks No. 1 & 2— H. I. Johnson. S. A. McConkey 
Farmers No. 1 & 2 — W. L. House, J. P. Bunn 
Victory No. 1 & 2— Cliff Weeks, W. L. Leggett 

Wallace (one set buyers) 

Blanchard & Farrior — O. C. Blanchard, W. H. Farrior 
Hussey No. 1 & 3 — W. L. Hussey, G. D. Bennett 
Bryant & Blanchard — J. H. Bryant 



23 



Washington (one set buyers) 

Gravelys — H. C. Gravely & Sons 

Sermons No. 1 & 2 — W. J. Sermons, J. E. Roberson 

Hassell-Knott-Edwards 1 & 2 — L. E. Knott, M. M. Hassell, W. S. Edwards 

Wendell (two sets buyers) 

Banners No. 1 & 2— J. W. Dale, Jr., Mgr. 
Farmers 1 & 2 — L. R. Clark & Son 
Northside — G. Dean, E. H. Price & [. H. Sanders 
Planters — G. Dean, E. H. Price & J. H. Sanders 
Liberty— H. F. Harris, I. D. Medlin 
Star A & B— J. S. Benard, C. Walker 

Wilson (five sets buyers) 

Big Dixie— E. B. Hicks, R. P. Dew, W. C. Thompson 

Wainwright — G. L. Wainwright 

Center Brick No. 1-2-3 — Cozart & Eagles Co. 

Farmers — J. J. Gibbons, S. G. Deans 

Growers Coop. — S. E. Griffin, Mgr. 

New Planters No. 1 & 2— R. T. & W. C. Smith, B. W. Carr 

Smith Warehouse, Inc. A, B & C— H. H. Harris. Jr., Mgr. 

Watson — Cozart & Eagles Co. 

Clark's— C. R. & Boyd Clark 

New Liberty — Carl B. Reniro 

Williamston (one set buyers) 

Carolina— S. C. Griffin, H. L. ISarnhill, |. li. Taylor, E. Lillry 
Farmer— S. C. Griffin, H. L. Bnrnhill, ). B. Taylor, E. Lillcy 
Planters — J. W. Gurkin 
Roanoke-Dixie — J. W. Gurkin 

Windsor (one set buyers) 

Farmers — S. F. & J. F. Hicks 
Rogers — R. E. Rogers, R. E. Harris 

MIDDLE BELT 

Aberdeen (one set buyers) 

\cw Aberdeen — licrnanl S^ ('lydc Morris, )ohn Mnrr.u 
Planters — E. B. MavnarLl, Win. Maucr 
Bass— Ta It Bass 

Carthage (one set buyers) 

.McConnclls— W. M. & G. I). Carter 

Smothers No. 1 Cx 2 — H. P. \ R. I). Sniolhcrs 

\'ictory— D. T. Bailey, K. L. Comer 

Durham (three .sets buyers) 

Liberty — John & Walker Stone, Clyde Roberts 

Mangum — S. B. Manguni, I. !•'. Sattcrhcld 

Planters — J. M. Talley 

Roycroft— H. T., M. A. .\ j. K. Roycrolt, J. C. Cuirin 

Star l?rick — .\. L. Carver 

24 



i 

J 



Ellerbe (one set buyers) 

Farmers — Geo. Mabe, L. G. Dewitt 
Richmond County — W. H. & H. P. Rummage 

Fuquay-Varina (two sets buyers) 

Big Top — King Roberts, E. E. Clayton 

Centeral— S. T. Proctor, P. L. Campbell, R. H. Barbour 

New Deal— W. M., R. B, A. L. Talley 

Planters— W. M., R. B., A. L. Talley 

Talley Bros.- W. M., R. B., A. L. Talley 

Southside — }. C. Adams, J. W. Stephenson 

Varina-Brick — J. C. Adams, J. W. Stephenson 

Gold Leaf— P. L. Campbell, R. H. Barbour, S. T. Proctor 

Henderson (two sets buyers) 

Banners — C. J. Fleming, C. B. Turner, E. C. Huff, L. B. Wilkinson 

Carolina — W. B. Daniel, P. S. Royster, A. H. Moore 

Moore's Big Henderson — W. B. Daniel, F. S. Royster, A. H. Moore 

Farmers — W. J. Alston 

High Price— C. J. Fleming, C. B. Turner, E. C. Huff, L. B. Wilkinson 

Liberty — George T. Robertson 

Alston — W. J. Alston & Son 

Louisburg (one set buyers) 

Big Franklin— A. N. Wilson, S. T. & H. B. Cottrell 
Southside A & B — Charlie Ford 
Union — G. C. Harris, N. F. Freeman 

Oxford (two sets buyers) 

Banner — W. L. Mitchell 

Mitchell— W. L. Mitchell 

Farmers — S. T. during, B. T. Williams, Julian Adcock 

Mangum — S. T. Currin, B. T. Williams, Julian Adcock 

Fleming No. 1 & 2— G. B. Watkins, D. T. Currin, H. G Taylor 

Planters— C. R. Watkins 

Johnson — C. R. Watkins 

Owens No. I & 2 — J. S. Watkins, L. Gregory 

Sanford (one set buyers) 

Big Sanford— Joe M. Wilkens, G. T. Hancock 
Wilkens — Joe M. Wilkens, G. T. Hancock 
Farmers Flag — C. W. Puckett, F. L. McCallum 
Wood 3-W No. 1 & 2— W. F. Wood 
Central No. 1 & 2— D. T. Hobgood 

Warrenton (one set buyers) 
Boyd's— W. P. Burwell 

Center No. 1 & 2— M. D. Carroll, C. E. Thompson 
Currin's No. 1 & 2— D. G. Currin, C. W. Currin 
Farmers — E. Cj. Tarwater 



25 



OLD BELT 

Burlington (one set buyers) i 

Carolina— R. D. Tickle, J. G. McCrary, B. G. Conner , 

Coble — N. C. Newman, Elton Hughes 
Farmers— O. H. King, C. R. McCauley, R. W. Rainery -^ 

Greensboro (one set buyers) - 

Greensboro Tobacco Warehouse Co. — R. C. Coleman, Mgr. 
Guilford County Warehouse Co. — J. R. Pell, Mgr. 

Madison (one set buyers) 

New Brick— R. T. Chilton, S. F. Wcb.stcr, R. G. Angcll 
Carolina— R. T. Chilton, S. F. Webster, R. G. Angell 
Sharp & Smith— W. S. Smith, H. A. Fagg 
Farmers— W. S. Smith, H. A. Fagg, J. R. Price 

Mebane (one set buyers) 

Farmers— R. L. Dale, E. L. Dudley 

Piedmont — J. F. McCauley, I. C. Farabow, J. D. Wood 

Planters— J. W. DiUard, J. B. Keck, J. H. Warren 

Mt. Airy (one set buyers) 

New Dixie — D. L. Bludgett, Hub Brown 

Liberty — R. C. Simmons, Jr., F. V. Dearmin, Dave Smith 

Simmons — R. C. Simmons, Jr., F. V. Dearmin, Dave Smith 

Va.-Carolina — R. W. Newsom, W. B. Simpson 

Lovills — R. W. Newsom, W. M. Simpson 

Planters & Jones — Tom and Frank Jones, Buck White 

Reidsville (one set buyers) 

Browns— G. E. Smith, P. D. McMichael, R. Roberts, D. Huffines 
Farmers— G. E. Smith, P. D. McMichael, R. Roberts, D. Huffines 
Leader — A. P. Sands, A. G. Irvin, J. L. Pinnix 
Watts— A. P. Sands, A. G. Irvin, J. L. Pinnix 
Smothers — T. B. & J. M. Smothers 

Roxboro (one set buyers) 

Farmers — Lindsay Wagstaff, R. L. Hester 

Hyco— W. R. Jones, F. J. Hester, Geo. Walker 

Foacre— H. W. Winstead, Jr., J. H. Merritt, D. L. Whitfield 

Planters No. I & 2— T. O. Pass 

Winstead— T. T. & Elmo Mitchell 

Stoneville (one set buyers) 

Brown's No. 1 & 2— O. P. Joyce, Roy Carter 
Farmers — F. A. Brown, P. M. Moorefield 
Piedmont — J. J. Webster, G. D. Rakeslraw 
Slate Brothers No. 1 & 2— B. R. & B. M. Slate 

Winston-Salem (four sets buyers) 

Brown — R. W. Newsomc, W. B. Simpson 
Carolina — H. M. Bouldin, G. H. Robertson 
Dixie— Floyd Joyce, W. C. Sheets, |. R. Pel! 

2r. 



Farmers — Floyd Joyce, W. G. Sheets, J. R. Pell 

Glenn & Banner Co. — C. T. Glen,n D. L. Harris, Chas. Dalton 

Liberty — M. M. Joyner, J. R. Pell, W. G. Sheets, Floyd Joyce 

Pepper No 1 & 2 — F. D. Pepper 

Piedmont— B. E. Cook, C. B. Strickland 

Planters — Foss Smithdeal, Frank Smithdeal, Joe Sharp 

Taylor — Paul Taylor, J. H. Dyer 

Big Winston— R. T.. J. F. Carter 

Cooks No. 1 & 2— B. E. Cook, C. B. Strickland 

Perkins & Newman No. 1 & 2 — N. C. Newman, J. W. & H. L. Perkins 

N. C. BURLEY BELT 
Asheville (one set buyers) 

Carolina — Max Roberts, Mgr. 

Farmers Federation — Max Roberts, Mgr. 

Dixie No. 1 & 2— J. C. Adams 

Planters No. 1 & 2— J. W. Stewart, Fred D. Cockfleld 

Bernard-Walker Warehouses — James E. Walker, Mgr. 

Boone (one set buyers) 

Mountain Hurley No. 1 & 2 — R. C. Coloman 
Farmers Burley — R. C. Coloman 

West Jefferson (one set buyers) 

Tri-State Burley — C. C. Taylor 
Planters — C. C. Taylor 



27 



Trends in the Tobacco Industry 

The tobacco industry has encountered many changes in con- 
sumers' preference for tobacco products during the past century. 
At one time or another the industry has experienced the rise 
in popularity of pipe tobacco, snuff, chewing tobacco, and cigars, 
each in its turn according to the fashions and habits of the 
particular period. Early in the present century the trend of 
tobacco users started shifting toward cigarettes. Since then this 
shift has developed such proportions as to revolutionize the 
entire tobacco industry. For example, the production of cigar- 
ettes jumped from 218 billion in 1941 to 430 billion in 1952, or 
almost doubled. 

Today, there are several trends in operation that point to a 
continued increase in the use of cigarettes. First of all, the per 
capita consumption of cigarettes is on the rise and will prob- 
ably continue to rise as long as favorable economic conditons 
prevail. 

Then we have the growing population trend of the country 
which accounts for a substantial increase in the number of 
smokers each year. The extra high birth rate during the war 
years of the 1940's will have its effect on the cigarette industry 
during the next few years with a pronounced increase in con- 
sumption. The industry will get the greatest impact from the 
war births during the early 1960's. 

Another trend is the increase in the number of women 
smokers. Women timidly began to smoke following the First 
World War, and the number of women smokers has continued 
to increase since that time. However, most women smokers are 
under 40 years of age today, which points to a greater demand 
for cigarettes by the fairer sex in the future, as the non- 
smoking women of the older generation are replaced in the 
population ranks by younger women who do smoke. 

The growth in demand for filter-type and denicotinized 
cigarettes has reached such proportions as to indicate a signifi- 
cant trend. The smoking public is accepting the filter-type 
cigarettes in increasing numbers year after year. The promi- 
nence of the filter-type cigarette is shown by the large number 
of manufacturers who have entered this field in recent years. 

The rapid rise in the number of king-size cigarettes sold 
throughout the country constitutes another major development 
in the tobacco industry. The sale of king-size cigarettes in- 

2S 



creased 53.5% in 1952 over the 1951 sales. The king-size volume 
last year was 77 billion cigarettes, which was 17.6% of the 
industry's total output. In 1940 the king-size output was only 
7.2 billion cigarettes, or 4.4% of the total production. The 
total output of cigarettes in 1952 was 4.30 billion, which is a 
gain of about 12 billion over 1951. 

The following table shows the total consumption for 1952 
and 1951 of the six leading cigarette brands, including all 
king-size cigarettes of the same brand names: 

Billions of Cigarettes 

1952 19S1 

Brand Total Output Total Output 

Camel 113.5 111.2 

Luckv Strike «2.2 H5.5 

Chesterfield 74.3 71.8 

Pall Mall X. 46.0 ' 34.1 

Philip Morris 39.3 42.9 

Old Gold 23.8 22.3 

During the last decade many tobacco companies have estab- 
lished their own research laboratories. This development is 
bringing about a closer working relationship between scientific 
research and the manufacturing of tobacco products. For in- 




The modern process of cigarette making, packaging and placing tlie 
packs in cartons ready for the consumer. 

29 




A modern cigarette machine capable of making 12 to 15 hundred 
cigarettes per minute. 

Stance, the laboratories make detailed analyses of soils and 
tobacco leaf samples from all sections of the tobacco producing 
areas; and from the laboratory analyses the companies can tell 
exactly where the type of tobacco is grown that has the quali- 
ties best suited to their particular manufacturing purpose. In 
many cases the analyses are so complete that the buyers know 
which individual farms in a certain section grow the quality 
of tobacco most desirable for their particular use. 

This research development by the companies should be of a 
major significance to tobacco growers, who also have available 
the aid of .scientific research in producing and marketing their 
tobacco. It should develop among growers an incentive to 
utilize more efficiently the knowledge ad\-anced through agri- 
cultural research. By applying the approved practices developed 
through agricultural research the grower will be able to use 
his soil to the best advantage in producing the quality of tobacco 
demanded by the manufacturers of tobacco products. 



30 



TOBACCO CONSUMPTION 

Per Capita, 15 Years Old and Over 



LBS 

12 

9 
6 
3 



Total 



V. 






Smoking, 
chewing, snuff 



^'— Cigarettes 




1920 



1930 



1940 



1950